Famous and Incredible Prison Breaks ever made in the History - maitengok!

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Sunday, March 30, 2014

Famous and Incredible Prison Breaks ever made in the History

Gerards London Tower Escape



Gerards London Tower Escape
Source: Google
John Gerard who was a 16th century priest who became very famous was the very first person to escape from the notorious London Tower after one failed attempt he managed to escape from the tower by climbing out of the prison cell window by the help of a rope and landed nearly to his death and made one of the most successful prison escapes.

Dilinger's Country Jail escape



Dilinger's Country Jail escape
Source: Google
John Dilinger was one of the most famous outlaws of the 1930's and what made him more famous was his daring escape from the "escape proof" prison in Lake County Jail, a prison which is guarded by an army of police officers and National Guard Troops, by using a fake gun, which he carved out of a soap and managed to slip away from all the police officers, this event made him more notorious and more wanted by the FBI thus eventually led to his death too.

Casanova’s Escape from the Leads



Casanova’s Escape from the Leads
Source: Google
Casanova has always been remembered by most as a romantic man of the ladies by the people, but what they didn't know was the fact that he also made one of the most daring escapes in history. He escaped from the lead prison by the help of a metal spike and thus you could have guessed that the lead prison was made mostly of lead and thus the spike became more useful in prying open the top roof of the cell thus making his escape a memorable escape in the history of prison breaks.

Billy Hayes’ Escape From Turkish Prison



Billy Hayes’ Escape From Turkish Prison
Source: Google
Billy Hayes was an American student who was arrested in 1970 for trying to smuggle 2 pounds of hash onto a plane in Turkey and was sentenced to serve 30 years in Turkish prison. After spending five years in mainland prison, he was transferred to an island prison, from where he started to plan for his escape. The island had no boats, but a nearby harbor would frequently fill up with small fishing vessels any time. There was a strong storm when Hayes spent days hiding in a concrete bin and he his move when the time was right by getting to the nearby harbor and stole a small Dinghy by which he was able to escape the island.

The Maze Prison Escape



The Maze Prison Escape
Source: Google
One of the most violent prison escapes of all time, the Maze Prison break took place in 1983, when 35 inmates escaped after taking control of the prison by force. The Maze was reserved for Irish Republican Army paramilitary combatants and terrorists, and was considered to be one of the most inescapable prisons in all of Europe. But after several months of planning, a group of prisoners led by IRA members Gerry Kelly and Bobby Storey seized control of an entire cellblock by using handguns that had been smuggled into the jail. After wounding several of the guards and stealing their uniforms, the prisoners hijacked a car and took over a nearby guard post, but when they couldn’t get past the main gate, the men hopped the fence and made a run for it on foot. All told, 35 men escaped from the prison– sixteen of whom were recaptured soon after–and twenty guards were injured

Libby Prison Escape



Libby Prison Escape
Source: Google
The Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia was one of the most infamous prisons during the Civil War. It housed hundreds of war prisoners. In 1864, 15 union soldiers under the command of Col. Thomas E. Rose and Major A.G Hamilton managed to escape the prison by tunneling under the basement of the prison and thus reaching a vacant lot nearby the prison. Of the 109 that dared the escape, 48 were captured, 2 drowned in a nearby river, and 59 managed to reach safely, thus making it the largest prison escape in the history.

Payet's Helicopter Escape



Payet's Helicopter Escape
Source: Google
Most European prisons allow prisoners to exercise on the rooftop of the prison and thus making it easier for the inmates to escape, one such particular incident took place in 2001 in France’s Luynes Prison where one of the inmates named Pascal Payet made one of the most daring and memorable escapes by taking a helicopter which was on the helipad of the roof and escaped but was eventually caught but then again he made the same escape in 2007 only this time with a couple of help and disappeared for good.

Colditz Escape



Colditz Escape
Source: Google
Colditz was one of the most famous German war camp prison during World War II, though there were numerous successful escapes in the camp, one in particular caught the attentions of Historians and thus making it into the list of the greatest prison escapes. Two British pilots jack and bill made the spectacular prison break by building an actual glider which was capable of carrying two men, and with the help of it they made into the history books.

Alfréd Wetzler escape from Nazi prison camp



Alfréd Wetzler escape from Nazi prison camp
Source: Google
Alfred was one of the few people in history to have escaped from Auschwitz death camp. Alfred and his fellow escapee made the escape through the underground tunnel in 1944. The two men climbed inside a hollowed-out hiding place in a wood pile that was being stored to build the “Mexico” section for the new arrivals. It was outside Birkenau’s barbed-wire inner perimeter, but inside an external perimeter the guards kept erected during the day. The other prisoners placed boards around the hollowed-out area to hide the men, then sprinkled the area with pungent Russian tobacco soaked in gasoline to fool the guards’ dogs. The two remained in hiding for 4 nights to avoid recapture and thus became prominent figures in prison escapes.

Escape from Alcatraz



Escape from Alcatraz
Source: Google
The Alcatraz was famous for its inevitable solid confinement which made the thought of prison escape almost impossible and ridiculous, But three Alcatraz inmates defied that odd and made the first escape from the rock. They were Frank Morris and Clarence and John Anglin, it was not until the next morning of the escape that the officials got to know of their meticulous escape plan, they were seamingly drilling a way to escape in their prison cell's aging concrete walls and to make sure no one doubted them they used dummy heads made out of soap, human hair, and toilet paper to make the patrolling officers think they were sleeping and tricked all of them. The search party never found anything, it was believed they must have drowned in the water, but their bodies were never found. So far as considering, they did make the escape out of the rock, nothing else matters, as its because of this they are at the top of the greatest escapes made in History.

The Great Escape



The Great Escape
Source: Google
For sheer planning, risk and scale prison escapes don’t get much more complex than the 1944 escape of 76 Allied soldiers from Stalag Luft III, a German prison that operated during WWII. The escape was the culmination of over a year of work by some 600 prisoners. The men dug three tunnels (nicknamed “Tom,” “Dick,” and “Harry”) 30 feet beneath the surface of the prison with the plan of tunneling past the main fence and surfacing in the nearby forest. This required a sophisticated construction process that included the use of wood blocks for support, a series of lamps, and even a pump to make sure the soldiers digging had enough air to breathe. After gathering a collection of civilian clothes and passports, In 1944 the soldiers began to make their escape. Unfortunately, the tunnel had come up short of the forest, and as the men surfaced they were in clear sight of the guards. 76 men still managed to escape, but the 77th was spotted and the tunnel was shut down.

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